Last edited by Sazragore
Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of role of the land speculator in Western development. found in the catalog.

role of the land speculator in Western development.

Paul W. Gates

role of the land speculator in Western development.

by Paul W. Gates

  • 92 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Bobbs-Merrill in Indianapolis .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Reprinted from the "Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography", Vol.66, July 1942.

SeriesBobbs-Merrill reprint series in history -- H-82
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13877650M

  Part one tells the story of young Washington’s early experiences on the frontier, from his days as a surveyor and would-be land speculator to his role as a militia officer during the French and Indian War.9/ This Land Is My Land: The Role of Place in Native Hawaiian Identity Shawn Malia Kanaÿiaupuni and Nolan Malone correspondence may be sent to: Shawn Malia Kanaÿiaupuni, Research and Evaluation, Kamehameha Schools South King Street Suite , Honolulu, Hawaiÿi Email: [email protected]

Social and Human Development and Special Programmes 48 17 SOUTHERN AFRICAN CUSTOMS UNION (SACU) 49 18 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH AFRICA - NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 49 National Policy 50 Economic Growth 51 Poverty 51 19 PROJECTS IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE WESTERN CAPE 52 The RED Door Project 52 . 2 Transnational corporations and land speculation in Brazil Introduction 1. The socio-environmental characteristics of the Cerrado biome 2. Occupation of the Cerrado and the indigenous and peasant communities (quilombolas, babassu nut breakers, vazanteiros, and geraizeiros) 3. The peoples of the Cerrado today 4. The expansion of agricultural business in the Cerrado and theLocation: The.

The pueblos of New Mexico and the protection of their land and water rights / Willard Rollings --Regaining Dinetah: the Navajo and the Indian Peace Commission at Fort Sumner / David Lanehart --No more treaties: the Resolution of and the alteration of Indian rights to their homelands / John R. Wunder --The great landholders and political. The Western Public Lands: An Introduction Sarah F. Bates University of Colorado Boulder. Western Lands Program million additional acres through grants to states to encourage railroad development. Today, land managers struggle to managea"checkerboard" system ofpublic andprivate Manyofthe land speculators, mining, timberand cattleAuthor: Sarah F. Bates.


Share this book
You might also like
satisfactions and cost of children

satisfactions and cost of children

They get heaps

They get heaps

Abigails Garden

Abigails Garden

O. G. S. Crawford

O. G. S. Crawford

stones of London; or, Macadam versus vestries.

stones of London; or, Macadam versus vestries.

Edinburghs capital Christmas

Edinburghs capital Christmas

Frederic Chopin, son of Poland

Frederic Chopin, son of Poland

Pygmalion

Pygmalion

Wolves

Wolves

Morals, law, and life

Morals, law, and life

Adventures in Time and Space with Max Merriwell (Audiofy Digital Audiobook Chips)

Adventures in Time and Space with Max Merriwell (Audiofy Digital Audiobook Chips)

Role of the land speculator in Western development by Paul W. Gates Download PDF EPUB FB2

The cRole of the jQand Speculator in Western Development The land use pattern of the twenty-nine public land states of the South, the Middle West and the Far West is the result of a long process of development and adaptation in which such factors as speculation.

The Role of the Land Speculator in Western Development. Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. Current Archives About About The Role of the Land Speculator in Western Development Article.

Paul Wallace Gates + Cited by: The speculators, railroads and land companies were important factors in the development of the West. Their efforts to attract settlers to their lands through the distribution of pamphlets and other advertising literature describing the western country lured thousands from their homes in the eastern states, from developed sections of the West, and from Europe.

The result was an explosion in speculation between and Insales of public land were over percent of what they had been on average between and A principle obstacle to speculation was the presence of squatters, who had settled on western lands without purchasing them. ing in government land was far more rewarding than some contem-poraries were willing to admit.

A growing number of twentieth-century students of American economic development have turned their attention to this question of "'Profits' and the Frontier Land Speculator," to use the title of the pathbreaking article by Allan G. Bogue and Margaret B. Bogue.

Portraying the West as a land of limitless opportunity, the bureaus offered long-term loans and free transportation to the West. Between andnot only did the railroads attract settlers from nearby states, but also brought million foreign immigrants to the trans-Mississippi West.

For most of the above authors, land had a sp ecial role in the production process and their writing focused on questions of productivity of la nd or the distribution of its proceeds.

But the. The saying was, land speculators “produce more poverty than potatoes and consume more midnight oil in playing poker than of God's sunshine in the game of raising wheat and corn.” —Prof. Benjamin Hibbard, the earliest land scholar, (or even earlier).

Ever wonder where those names for towns and downtown streets come from. The names of US universities. As there were vast expanses of public land available throughout much of the the history of the United States, land speculators sometimes bought up large parcels with the specific intent of withholding them from the market.

This very act of land speculation could drive prices up, but sometimes had detrimental effects as well. the frontier land speculator was a familiar figure in the United States.1 Perambulating foreigners recorded the activities of this gen-tleman, and land speculation was discussed in both Congress and in the editorial columns of Western newspapers.

Many twentieth-century students of America's political and economic development have dealtCited by: Books at Amazon. The Books homepage helps you explore Earth's Biggest Bookstore without ever leaving the comfort of your couch.

Here you'll find current best sellers in books, new releases in books, deals in books, Kindle eBooks, Audible audiobooks, and so much more.

The Pursuit of Land In early America the pursuit of land drove the movement west. “The population of the United States was like a body of water that was being steadily enlarged by internal spring and external tributes,” wrote historian Max Farand.

1 Early America concentrated on becoming an ownership society or perhaps an ownership. They requested for the government to own railroads, telephones, and telegraphs to help the farmers transport there goods faster and cheaper.

Since the price of the good could not change, and the price of the labor could not change, the only thing that could was the transportation cost- which is what the Populist Party campaigned for. relating to the ownership of land and the boundaries that define the limitations of that ownership, including a review of the role of surveyors in the determination of land boundaries.

As such, it does not purport to be a source of legal advice, nor is it intended to be a complete or absolute treatise of the subject. About the author. This volume features the best and most influential essays by Donald Pisani, one of our nation's leading environmental and western historians.

Collectively, the essays highlight the central role played by land, water, and timber allocation in the American West and show how efforts to achieve justice and efficiency were compromised by the region's obsession with achieving rapid economic by: OHIO LANDS Ohio occupies a unique place in the development of the public lands of the United States.

No other state experienced so many different systems of original land survey. As the first state formed out of the public domain, Ohio was the social labo-ratory in which Congress worked out not only the basic Federal Rectangular Survey.

Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library. Fundamentals of Land Development provides an in-depth approach to the design, planning, and development of large land areas into comprehensively designed communities.

This book provides in-depth discussions of the full range of development tasks involved in any large development project, from site and land use selection, market analysis. My hypotheses are that the private land ownership in the U.S.

essentially facilitates land speculation at the urban-rural fringe and therefore, to some extent, promotes urban sprawl. Private land ownership allows land speculators to easily buy land at the urban fringe, hold it for a period of time and then sell it to developers.

Business and the Economy: Overview. Westward Migration. Following the American Revolution, Americans swarmed to the West. Kentucky and Tennessee provided the beachhead for the vanguard of land-hungry settlers. After the War of subsequent waves of pioneers flowed into the Ohio River valley, the Great Lake states, the Gulf Plain, and the Mississippi River valley.

A land speculator is someone who buys land hoping it will go up in value. They did not buy it based on the income it produces, but because they think it will have a higher value in the future when they can sell and take a profit.

A few reasons lan.Many of these so-called Exodusters answer the call of Benjamin “Pap” Singleton, a land speculator with a vision of establishing independent black communities across the state.

Although Virginia claimed the lands in the Western Reserve, New York claimed the land by her charter of granted by the King of England, Pennsylvania by the charter granted to William Penn inand Connecticut by her charter granted in All the royal charters granted land claims to the colonies westward to the mythical "South Sea.".